editorial

Allie Holton

Allie Holton

I came into the shoot with an open mind and approach. We started with a clean slate and started layering emotions and fragments of stories that we came up with together. At some point during our shoot, I started to see emotions and feelings coming through Allie that I had just experienced myself--things that I'm still working through.

When you start to see yourself moving, feeling, and reacting right in front of your eyes through somebody else it feels so magical.   

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Sibling

There is a little boy inside the man who is my brother... Oh, how I hated that little boy. And how I love him too.

-Anna Quindlen

 

Models: Joshua Wilson with Next Models, Dayne Eigner with M

Wardrobe Stylist: Sabrina Che

 

 

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"My Skin, My Body" featured on Udee (part 3)

My photo series, My Skin, My Body is being featured on Udee for a second installment. In the series, I photograph women in nature with no retouching. The feature includes an interview I did with Fahamisha Thompson who sat in for the series. Udee is doing some amazing things and I'm so honored to be a part of it! See the link below for the feature!

http://udee.co/skin-body-part-3/

 

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New Iconic in Fantastics Magazine

On the shifting nature of fame, author Jill Neimark writes that “where once the famous achieved an almost godlike status, one that seemed impermeable and historical, today celebrity exists for and by an information age.” There is a new template for fame and it involves the disclosure of personal information as a form of social currency. The once enigmatic and elusive figure that fans would project their own dreams and hopes onto has slowly dissipated into obscurity and been replaced with a figure that is online and available for public consumption. The less one shares, the more they fade out of public consciousness.

We want to see the person as a product and learn about the process of becoming them--how they apply their makeup, what they eat, where they sleep, and we want it in real time. Product endorsements are a signifier of fame and are presented as a tool to achieve emulation. Past icons are protected on their pedestals of fame and mystery because their rise predated tools like social media that are built on an excess of mundane details about people’s lives or because premature deaths left us with more questions than answers, maintaining the mystery. Yet it is a different kind of fame than that which builds icons. It is now through familiarity that we connect, no longer do we spend much time speculating--there is an entitlement to personal information. So much is exposed, that the cloak of mystery is dropped and we are left with a person and not a god.

I took iconic people and moments and recreated them in a present day context. I imagined what new archetypes these people or characters would potentially embody if their rise to fame was happening now. I explored the idea of constant visibility and self presentation, product endorsements, an infatuation with technology, and a general sense of ennui that seems to permeate so much imagery today. Justin Gossman w/Wilhelmina NYC was cast as Mick Jagger. Sam Evans w/Next LA & Wilhelmina NYC got into character as Elvis, James Dean, and Marlon Brando in "A Streetcar Named Desire." Lacey Claire Rogers w/No Ties became Frida Kahlo, Priscilla Presley, Amy Winehouse, and Marilyn Monroe.

Team Credits:

Photography by Kat Kaye

Models: Sam Evans w/Next Models LA and Wilhelmina NYC, Lacey Claire Rogers w/No Ties Management, Justin Gossman w/Wilhelmina LA/NYC and New Madison Paris

Wardrobe Stylist: Sabrina Che

Hair Stylist: Jen Puebla Alfaro

Makeup Artist: Sam Takao

 

View the webitorial at www.fantasticsmag.com/stories/new-iconic 

 

 

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Co-ruminators

Photography by Kat Kaye

Models: Leah Peterson & Claire Layman @ Hoffman Models, Kansas City

Hair & Makeup: Paige Pelfrey

Dedicated to a friend I once had. While the world we constructed and inhabited was quite small, at least we could be alone together. 

 

 

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Video coming soon

Interview & Editorial in Austere Magazine

I was recently interviewed by Vicky Andres at Austere Magazine for my "Against Me" series where I explore self reflection through sports and fashion. See below for the interview and the see the entire editorial and interview at www.austeremag.com/editorial-against-me/ 

 

 Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I have always had an interest in observing people, the process of introspection, and how we communicate different elements of our identities. I studied Communication at the University of California, San Diego and I was particularly affected by Michel Foucault’s writings on power and identity. It was then that I realized that how deeply our sense of self is predicated on cultural mores and not inherent traits, which reinforced the importance of questioning things on a regular basis and made me even more curious to explore what lies beneath the surface. Shortly after that, I found photography and studied at Art Center College of Design where I was able to take my ideas and communicate them through a visual means.

Can you expand more on the concept? I’m really interested in how you’ve portrayed boxing in artistic and editorial way. Can you tell me about what inspired that? Why sports?

In this series, I explore the inner turmoil and battling within the self in the context of a sport and a single player. I find it interesting that more often than not when we criticize and argue with others, we reveal more about ourselves than the actual target of our anger. And when we feel like we are fighting something within ourselves, it always seems as though the target or reason for our frustration is so out of reach and intangible that it can feel like you’re swinging punches underwater. The spectatorship of sports gives us a buffer of sorts where we watch players overcome difficulties and have a vicarious experience through watching. The sports arena becomes a sacred space. But in a battle against another, one ultimately competes with themselves. You can’t control your target, you can only know her better and work from an informed space. The same feels true for self examination.

 Who is the subject and why did you choose them?

I chose to work with Austin Victoria because of the commitment that I saw in each role he played in his portfolio. There was a sense of being rather than trying in each of his shots. Authenticity is important in how I approach my work. If I need someone to fight themselves in a photo shoot, it’s not enough for them to mimic the poses of that character. I need them to become it, if only for a moment. I want to see them going through the motions until it becomes real, until I see a shift. This requires a willingness on the subject’s behalf to be vulnerable. I could see that vulnerability in Austin.

What do these photos mean to you?

Every time I begin a series, it starts with a question that I’m asking of myself. The photos are a documentation of the process that goes into exploring that question and learning more, much like testing a hypothesis. I have an idea of what it will turn out like but I remain open to allowing things to progress organically. All of my photos are incredibly personal for me. Each image is essentially a self portrait and I feel very grateful for subjects and collaborators who help bring these ideas to life.

 What can we expect from the continued series?

So far, I’ve photographed boxing and baseball. I have more sports to shoot and will be incorporating women into the series as well. In fashion, there is traditionally an expectation for a woman to either be soft and affable or exuding sexuality. I’m interested in conveying strength through something other than sexuality for this series as I find it to be limiting to be defined so simply under those terms.

Is there anything about your work you wish people knew?

There is always something happening beneath the surface. If you’re having a reaction, I urge you to explore why.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

I am very grateful to work with such fantastic people. The entire crew for this shoot was extraordinary to work with. Austin stayed committed throughout and once he got into that mental space, the entire mood of the room changed. Sabrina Che did a beautiful job as she always does with the wardrobe styling, bringing in a softness that was necessary. This was my first time working with makeup artist Manny Rishi did a really amazing job. It was also great to work with Thomas at Whittier Fight Club where this was shot.

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Publication: Austere Magazine 

Model: Austin Victoria at Wilhelmina LA

Wardrobe Stylist: Sabrina Che

Hair & Makeup: Manny Rishi

Shot at Whittier Fight Club